Friday, November 15, 2013

The November Garden

We're approaching the time of year when frosty chillier mornings are much more frequent. The last of the flowers  are fading  and the foliage is gently falling. From a distance the garden looks as if it has finally fallen asleep but nestled close to the ground fresh new lenten rose buds have appeared and the first of the Witch hazel | Hamamelis flowers have started to uncurl their little ribbons.  For the rest of the garden all changes when  the November sunlight bathes the remaining autumn flowers with it's golden rays.





The sedums look their best these days when bathed in that morning light.
Sedum telephium ' Purple Emperor'
Sedum telephium ' Purple Emperor'

Sedum spectabile 'Autumn Joy'
Sedum spectabile 'Autumn Joy'



Sedum 'Red Carpet'
Sedum 'Red Carpet'
The little Mexican Fleabane daisy is still as floriferous as ever!


Erigeron karvinskianus
Erigeron karvinskianus

Roses still have buds though I'm unsure if they'll ever open. 


Rose carpet standard
Red Rose carpet standard

The very last Helenium flower glows in the sunshine. While the Rudbeckia flowers are ageing ever so gracefully along with the purple Verbena.
Helenium 'Wyndley'
Helenium 'Wyndley'
Rudbeckia 'Goldstrum'
Rudbeckia 'Goldstrum'
Verbena bonariensis
Verbena bonariensis


Fruits of the Season

There are lovely clusters of red berries from the  Pyracantha and Berberis shrubs. Candy pink fruits on the Rowan tree and little red crab apples on the Malus tree.  Elderberries hang on the Sambucus shrub and clusters of purple jewel berries on the Callicarpa.


Pyracantha 'Saphyr Rouge'  (Cadrou)
Pyracantha 'Saphyr Rouge'  (Cadrou)

Berberis 'Helmond Pillar'
Berberis 'Helmond Pillar'

Sorbus vilmorinii
Sorbus vilmorinii
Red Crab apples on Malus 'Profusion'
Red Crab apples on Malus 'Profusion'

Sambucus 'Black Lace' | Elderberry fruit
Sambucus 'Black Lace' | Elderberry
Callicarpa 'Profusion'
Callicarpa 'Profusion'
The silver birch tree that has given such a beautiful bokeh in many of the photos today is 'borrowed' as it's my neighbours tree which over hangs into our garden. 


Silver Birch catkins
Betula pendula  Silver Birch catkins
Finally here's a little glimpse of a small part of the garden from yesterday afternoon. The sun disappears from the garden by 2.00pm at this time of year.
leavesnbloom garden in November
garden photo taken 14th November 2013

Most of the evergreens are in the front garden which I rarely show on the blog.   Raking up leaves is the main job for me this weekend along with storing the garden furniture as snow is forecast for next week.

Here's what the garden looked like last year - What's in Bloom in November for Garden Bloggers Bloom Day.

Thanks for stopping by today and I would love to hear from you.  Please feel free to leave any questions or feedback in the comments section.

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22 comments:

  1. A really beautiful collection of photos. You're right - those sedums do seem to sparkle in the early morning light.

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  2. Berries do take centre stage at this time of the year, and anything flowering is appreciated. Gorgeous photos as always!

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  3. Hie Rosie!
    I discover your website and I like it very much.
    I follow you on Google+ and these photos are sooo beautiful! I love this morning light and the colours of these plants and flowers... such delicacy and sweetness!! My eyes ask for more of it!! ;-))

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  4. Perfectly captured Rosie - I do hope the weather holds out for you to get those chores done this weekend. Happy Bloom Day!

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  5. Thanks Jenny Hickson it's amazing how a little bit of sunshine can transform a plant at this time of year.

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  6. Hi Mark and Gaz The birds will certainly enjoy the feast when the really cold weather arrives. At the moment I've fallen apples over the lawn and the blackbirds are having a feast every day.

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  7. Hi Carline Tellice Great to have you visit one of my blogs :) I've lots more photos to share that I took on the same morning - they are of foliage and seedheads. I'll share them soon over here.

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  8. Not so sure what it's going to be like as everyone is talking about the snow forecast for next week instead. Thanks Angie - hope the weather is kind for you down in Edinburgh this weekend.

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  9. Glorious photographs Rosie. I love the berberis and the berries with bokeh. The rudbeckia is lovely too. Mine finished long ago. Perhaps next year, when it is more established, the flowers will be longer lasting. Snow, brrr!

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  10. So much loveliness Rosie, it is a magical time of year, with the soft light, the possiblity of sparkling frost, autumn leaves and still so many flowers. I am hoping to have Erigeron karvinskianus in my front garden next year, assuming the seed germinates, otherwise I will be forced to buy some, such a lovely plant. Can't believe you already have witch hazel starting to flower, I have a mass of buds on mine which is promising, but they won't do anything until late December at the earliest.

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  11. Thanks for some lovely photos. Loved the birch leaves ! Love the colour of the Callicarpa berries ... do they stay around for long ?

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  12. Hi Rosie! I just found your blog. Your pictures are gorgeous! I'm sure you will hear from me from now on, I also love your writing.

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  13. Still looks lovely Rosie! Berries make a big difference too - so long as the birds don't eat them all too quickly. :-)
    I too have Erigeron and Verbena b. flowering happily.

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  14. The sun disappeared by 2pm!!!
    Something that I cannot fathom.
    But truly I really wished I can get my hands on those lovely berries.
    And the sedum somehow look so hardy to handle whatever stress nature throws at them.
    It is really beautiful.

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  15. Hi rusty duck I find Rudbeckia hard to grow here so I hope yours does better further south.

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  16. Hi Janet/Plantaliscious I would love to scatter lots of seeds of Erigeron in my scree beds at the front too. I don't know why it took me years to introduce this plant into the garden - it's terrific and great for containers too.

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  17. Thanks Jane Scunthorpe I'm hoping to do a blog post soon on Callicarpa but by December the berries are not as plump and the birds start to feed on them. By the end of Dec the berries are usually gone.

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  18. Thanks Millymollymandy Our frosts have been so heavy this week that the Verbena has finally gone brown. The daisy has still a few flowers though.

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  19. Hi and thank you James Missier Perhaps I better say that the sun only disappears from my garden by 2pm - it's still out and shining in the field beside us until about 3.30 but very low in the sky.

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Rosie

 

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